greenpawpaw1
Pawpaws growing on the tree

pawpawsmoothie
Pawpaw smoothie made with cultured coconut milk

squareblueplate
Fresh Pawpaws chilled and ready to scoop with a spoon

frozenpawpaw
2 lb bag of frozen pawpaw pulp


What is a Pawpaw?
The pawpaw is a tropical-like fruit native to the forest fringes of the Midwest and parts of the South. Pawpaws were planted here ten years ago as part of the search for varieties that might be commercially successful in Rhode Island. The fruit looks a little like a mango, with large, brown seeds surrounded by a lemon yellow, creamy flesh the consistency of a firm custard. The pawpaw has a tropical flavor, which is often described as a combination of mango, pineapple, and banana.

Most enthusiasts agree that the best way to enjoy pawpaws is to eat them raw after they are picked and are perfectly ripe. A perfectly ripe pawpaw will be soft to the touch. The skin may be green, yellowish green, or even brownish and bruised looking. As long as the outside is soft to the touch, your pawpaw is ready to eat. A ripe pawpaw will only last a few days at room temperature, but you can store them in the refrigerator for up to a week after they are picked.

The flesh of the pawpaw will be a beautiful lemon yellow to orange yellow color. You just slice them open the long way and use a spoon to scoop out the yellow pulp. Never eat the skin or seeds. The pawpaw pulp can also be used in ice-cream, breads, muffins, smoothies, and sauces. There are many recipes online, and we will send you a few pawpaw recipes with your order.

pawpaw fruit in the tree Rocky Point Farm


NPR recently did a piece on pawpaws; read it here.

You can find
more information about pawpaws at these sites (the first, sponsored by Kentucky State University, offers a wealth of information):

http://www.pawpaw.kysu.edu/

http://www.petersonpawpaws.com

http://www.pawpaw.tv/

http://www.providencejournal.com/features/food/content/20131023-r.i.-farm-sings-the-praises-of-pawpaws.ece